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Artist Bios — November 2014

Sandy Anderson: I typically paint characters in my neighborhood. This piece is a turn to more classical forms, inspired by poetry about ballet. Always, I want to make an image that can only be expressed as a painting or drawing, and therefore avoid lighting situations, detail, and a certain level of realism. I enjoy painterliness and, simultaneously, economy.

Corfman_PhotoSam Corfman recently returned to his hometown of Chicago from Southern California, where he studied English, Biology, and a little bit of writing at Pomona College. Recent work has appeared in 1913: a journal of forms, Calibanonline, and qu.ee/r Magazine.

photo(29)Eleanor Edgeworth, who was born and raised in Baltimore, MD, had worked most of her career in the publications field. The last 20 years of which were at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, attaining the level of Associate Professional Staff at the time of her retirement in 2010. A major project there was as Design Associate for the award-winning Johns Hopkins APL Technical Digest. She has been painting in oils for over 30 years. In 2012 she began exploring the abstract in mixed-media works. Her paintings reside in Maryland, Pennsylvania, and California. Eleanor graduated with Honors as an art major from what is now known as Baltimore City Community College and has continued her art education over the years with courses at various local institutions. She is a member of the Women Artists Forum, School 33 Art Center and the Baltimore Museum of Art.

Juliannah Harrison has been exploring and residing in Baltimore for four years! Originally, here for Maryland Institute College of Art’s illustration program, her ‘knack’ for teaching illustration and drawing classes, in the Anne Arundel County school district, soon followed. As an illustrator and teacher stories, secrets, wrinkles, hair, moles, and people mean everything. Most of her work is in ink, hints of colour with found material for the surfaces. Her idea is to ask the questions we all want to receive, but never hear.

Katie Hogan is a MFA candidate in Poetry at the University of New Hampshire, where she has also been a poetry editor for the literary journal Barnstorm. She lives on the New Hampshire seacoast.

Hynes photo 2Maureen Hynes won the League of Canadian Poets’ Gerald Lampert Award for best first book of poetry by a Canadian. Her fourth book of poetry will appear in 2015. A past winner of England’s Petra Kenney Award, her work has been widely published in Canadian journals and anthologies, included in Best Canadian Poems 2010 and longlisted for the CBC Canada Reads 2013 poetry award. Maureen is poetry editor for Our Times magazine. www.maureenhynes.com

Sharain Mines is owner, artist and designer for Green Apple Core Creations.

Erin Ouslander is an artist living in Baltimore.

Francine Rubin- Author PhotoFrancine Rubin‘s chapbook, Geometries, is available from Finishing Line Press, and her pamphlet The Last Ballet Class is forthcoming from Neon.  More poems and thoughts appear at francinerubin.tumblr.com

Dina Riddle currently lives in Austin, TX with her husband, Ryan and dog, Jet. Dina is a graphic designer but in her spare time paints and does calligraphy.

ronan_photoJohn Ronan is a National Endowment for the Arts Fellow in Poetry, 1999-2000.  His last book, Marrowbone Lane, appeared in 2009 (Backwaters Press); Linda Pastan has called his work “Very good indeed: original, assured, just a touch sardonic.” Poems have appeared in Confrontation, Folio, Threepenny Review, The Recorder, Hollins Critic, New England Review, Southern Poetry Review, Louisville Review, Greensboro Review, Notre Dame Review, NYQ, et. al.

Jordan Shelton is an art student.

IMG_2420Born and raised in New York, Monique Zamir lives in Stillwater whilst she attends an MFA program for poetry in Oklahoma State University. She’s an assistant editor for the Cimarron Review and has had her poetry published in Lunch Ticket’s Amuse-Bouche feature. She finds the screeches of the subway to be energizing, and, yes, comforting.

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